Don’t Just Leave Them

Leaving the leaves on your lawn is not a good option. As the leaves get wet, they form a barrier that may suffocate the lawn as well as promote the growth of mold and fungus.

Don’t Burn Them

Gone are the days of raking or blowing the leaves into a gigantic pile and lighting them up! For one thing, in most city limits, it’s illegal and potentially dangerous. Burning leaves releases into the air contaminants such as allergens, mold, & soot — these are harmful to the environment and can irritate health conditions for many people. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): “the total health, financial, and environmental costs of leaf-burning can be quite high. These costs include higher incidences of health problems and increased health care costs; forest fires and property loss and need for increased fire protection; and the clean-up costs associated with soiling of personal property.”

Don’t Just Rake Them to the Street

Unless our community encourages this practice by routinely picking up curbside leaves with vacuum trucks, don’t do it! Leaves and debris will be washed toward storm drains, clogging them and causing flood conditions in case of heavy rains. Or it will be washed into local waterways where the waste products act as a fertilizer, promoting excess algae growth and depleting the water’s oxygen content. This jeopardizes the aquatic life.

Do Compost Them

Compost is a great way to condition and enhance your soil and a less-expensive, more eco-friendly alternative to commercial fertilizers. Here is how to make compost from your autumn leaves:

  1. Make a pile. The pile can be any shape or size, but most people like a rectangular pile that isn’t too wide so they can easily handle it — turning the contents or taking from the pile as needed. Start with six inches of leaves (shredded or whole), then add a layer of something more nitrogen rich (choose from: vines from your garden, grass clippings, organic garbage, green weeds, or manure).
  2. Keep the pile moist, but not soggy.
  3. Turn the pile every 3 – 4 weeks (or more often). If the pile is thoroughly turned 3 or 4 times before early spring, the compost material should be ready to use by then.

Do Use Them for Mulch

Use the mulching setting on your mower and bag the mulched leaves as you go mow over them. The finely shredded material makes great mulch for flower beds, shrubs, and trees.

Do Take Advantage of Community Services

Some communities provide curbside pickup of bagged or piled leaves. Check your city or county website for details. There may be restrictions on the type or number of bags you leave. Also, checking their pick-up schedule will assure you do not leave a pile of leaves on the curb several days before they will be picked up, which can result in the scenario described above. Here are some examples of community services in central Indiana:

Whatever method you choose, make sure you are not causing harm to the environment as you dispose of the autumn leaves and debris.

If you are a property manager or involved with a homeowner’s association, then you are likely responsible for the removal of leaves from common areas. Landscape Solutions can provide those services in central Indiana and more — seasonal landscaping services, snow and ice removal, even emergency response and disaster preparedness, all in an ecologically considerate way.

Contact Landscape Solutions today!

Don’t Just Leave Them

Leaving the leaves on your lawn is not a good option. As the leaves get wet, they form a barrier that may suffocate the lawn as well as promote the growth of mold and fungus.

Don’t Burn Them

Gone are the days of raking or blowing the leaves into a gigantic pile and lighting them up! For one thing, in most city limits, it’s illegal and potentially dangerous. Burning leaves releases into the air contaminants such as allergens, mold, & soot — these are harmful to the environment and can irritate health conditions for many people. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): “the total health, financial, and environmental costs of leaf-burning can be quite high. These costs include higher incidences of health problems and increased health care costs; forest fires and property loss and need for increased fire protection; and the clean-up costs associated with soiling of personal property.”

Don’t Just Rake Them to the Street

Unless our community encourages this practice by routinely picking up curbside leaves with vacuum trucks, don’t do it! Leaves and debris will be washed toward storm drains, clogging them and causing flood conditions in case of heavy rains. Or it will be washed into local waterways where the waste products act as a fertilizer, promoting excess algae growth and depleting the water’s oxygen content. This jeopardizes the aquatic life.

Do Compost Them

Compost is a great way to condition and enhance your soil and a less-expensive, more eco-friendly alternative to commercial fertilizers. Here is how to make compost from your autumn leaves:

  1. Make a pile. The pile can be any shape or size, but most people like a rectangular pile that isn’t too wide so they can easily handle it — turning the contents or taking from the pile as needed. Start with six inches of leaves (shredded or whole), then add a layer of something more nitrogen rich (choose from: vines from your garden, grass clippings, organic garbage, green weeds, or manure).
  2. Keep the pile moist, but not soggy.
  3. Turn the pile every 3 – 4 weeks (or more often). If the pile is thoroughly turned 3 or 4 times before early spring, the compost material should be ready to use by then.

Do Use Them for Mulch

Use the mulching setting on your mower and bag the mulched leaves as you go mow over them. The finely shredded material makes great mulch for flower beds, shrubs, and trees.

Do Take Advantage of Community Services

Some communities provide curbside pickup of bagged or piled leaves. Check your city or county website for details. There may be restrictions on the type or number of bags you leave. Also, checking their pick-up schedule will assure you do not leave a pile of leaves on the curb several days before they will be picked up, which can result in the scenario described above. Here are some examples of community services in central Indiana:

Whatever method you choose, make sure you are not causing harm to the environment as you dispose of the autumn leaves and debris.

If you are a property manager or involved with a homeowner’s association, then you are likely responsible for the removal of leaves from common areas. Landscape Solutions can provide those services in central Indiana and more — seasonal landscaping services, snow and ice removal, even emergency response and disaster preparedness, all in an ecologically considerate way.

Contact Landscape Solutions today!

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